Theresa May's ill-fated decision to call a snap election cost the taxpayer more than £140 million, official figures have revealed.

The Prime Minister's gamble to go to the country on June 8 involved extra spending to cover the cost of running the poll and more than £42 million on delivering election literature.

But despite the poll, in which she hoped to increase the Tories slender majority, Mrs May lost it completely and had to do a deal with the DUP to ensure the Tories could get through legislation.

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The poll was called three years earlier than expected under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act.

In a statement to MPs, Constitution Minister Chris Skidmore set out the impact of the poll on the Cabinet Office budget.

He said: "The UK General Election took place on 8 June 2017, resulting in an increase in non-voted programme Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit of £140,850,000."

The figures, for England, Scotland and Wales, comprise £98,310,000 to cover fees and expenses incurred by returning officers in running the contest.

A further £42,540,000 covered the cost of delivering election mailshots to voters.

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